wpid-chinese-take-out.jpgIf I had a dollar for every time I’ve had a discussion with someone who works with Microsoft System Center, while I stare at the floor, wondering why they never bothered to have that weird reddish-brown stain removed, and it’s in their main lobby, as they describe the pain, and effort they endured to build some crazy semi-automated chain of mouse traps using a wheelbarrow full of third-party utilities, truckloads of scripting, and a few crates of some long-forgotten Windows CLI utilities, registry hacks and whatever, and after they were done, I’d be thinking to myself “that was one stupidly-long run-on sentence”, but I end up saying, “You know? You could’ve knocked that out in a lot less time using Orchestrator”, well, I’d be rich enough to not have time to write a blog.  I’d be too busy having my toenails custom painted while skydiving from my private jet onto the deck of my private yacht. Floating in the lagoon of my private island.  Okay, that’s a big stretch.

Yeah.

First off, 99.999999999% of the time, here’s what the response is, “What’s Orchestrator?”

(15 seconds of awkward silence ensues)

Whatever Microsoft has paid their marketing folks, I would like to officially ask for 10% of it, just for doing my part to inform their customers, “well, it’s this amazing virtual Lego kit that you can use to build just about anything. Oh, and by the way, you already paid for it.”  That might help pay a few bills at least.  I think that I’ve earned it.  Or I could be delusional too.

Anyhow, for those who still begin every explanation with “it was called Opalis, once…”, and have ripped open that Christmas box and put the batteries inside, you know what I’m talking about.  You also know the dreaded feeling of hearing someone say one of the following:

“They didn’t make any changes to it in System Center 2016”

“It’s dead, Jim.  Long live the cloud.”

Sad.  Truly sad. It never really had it’s glory day (imho).  Isolated moments of sheer awesomeness are to be found, for sure.  But on a ubiquitous (see?  you didn’t think I could whip out a big word like ubiquitous, did you?) and pervasive scale? No; not what it really deserved. It was that incredible 2nd string player, drafted in the 2nd round, that was capable of smashing records, but never got on the field, and now it’s hitting retirement age.

Not so fast.

Just like Arnold Schwarzenegger (I cheated on the spelling, I had to), it can still press a few hundred pounds while smiling.  Maybe while clenching a cigar in it’s mouth at the same time.

Some interesting use-cases I’ve seen in the past year or two…

  • The typical New-Hire / Employee-Term scenario runbooks, but with extensions for ordering facilities services (phone, desk, chair, whiteboard), telecom (phone), computer equipment (HR app checkbox for “mobile user” triggers order for laptop or tablet), and notifying front desk security personnel with employee photo.  And don’t forget the standard AD group memberships, attributes, and OU management stuff.
  • Monitoring file system folder where app-devs upload final code check-ins, read specific files to create SCCM applications, deployment types, detection methods, requirements, as well as distribute to certain DP groups, and deploy to Collections (with additional parameters)

There have been a few others.  Some were just discussions around “what if…”, which could have easily turned into more amazing concoctions, but I didn’t stick around long enough to find out if they did.

Alas, before I toss back a ceremonial shot (of something cheap, like me), I have to say I’ve spent some time with Azure Automation runbook authoring and I have to say, it’s very, very promising indeed.

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