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So far, I’ve completed quite a few in-place upgrades to System Center Configuration Manager “current branch”.  However, more recently, I’ve stepped into quite a few upgrades to SQL Server 2016 and Windows Server 2016.  Some of those included SCCM hosts, AD Domain Controllers, Hyper-V hosts, and SQL Server hosts. Here’s some quick notes:

  • Hyper-V hosts: shutdown all guests.  If you don’t have backups, make them now or use the Export feature (which can be slow as hell).
  • If you get an error trying to invoke the setup.exe from a mounted ISO, restart the host and try it again.  In fact, prior to any upgrade, shut down all applications cleanly and do a standard shutdown/restart and wait a few minutes before starting the upgrade process.
  • NIC teams have to be removed/broken prior to the upgrade from 2012 or 2012 R2.
  • SCEP clients have to be uninstalled (if installed already).  If you’re using another AV product, shut it off and uninstall it prior to the upgrade.  Then reinstall later if necessary.
  • When upgrading an AD Domain Controller or member server which has RSAT ADDS tools installed, you will need to remove the “Identity Management for UNIX components” role service prior to the upgrade.
  • I recommend transferring FSMO roles to other DC’s while each is being upgraded, but you can skip this if you have a high testosterone level and a fat bank account.
  • If you’re using a vanilla ISO to perform the upgrade, and it’s now January 2017, and you haven’t obtained a patched version, expect 40-60 minutes of updates and several restarts along the way.
  • After the upgrade is done, if you had NIC teams and either continue without them, or recreate them, some Hyper-V guests may display an error when trying to start them which indicates a lack of permissions on the network interface.  To resolve, open the settings, (or use PowerShell), change the NIC association, click Apply, then change it back and click Apply.  The guest should start fine afterwards.
  • SQL Server hosts, double check the service configurations (accounts, start modes, etc.)  Verify them after the upgrade as well.

So far, so good.

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2 thoughts on “Notes from the Field: Windows Server 2016

  1. Awesome post – cheers! Gives me some things to think of if I run into this. “but you can skip this if you have a high testosterone level and a fat bank account.” – Awesome!

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